Friday, October 22, 2010

Shadow Shot Sunday 75, Colonia Roma
















This first shot is posted for all polite photographers worldwide!! I like to think I am courteous when taking shots, and always seek permission before taking close-ups or portraits, so imagine my surprise when wandering through the Colonia Roma recently taking shots of ordinary corners of ordinary buildings, a professional suited guy walking behind me along the street asked me very sternly why I was taking photos, and then reprimanded me, informing me rather harshly that I was not allowed to take photographs of private property in Mexico. (I didn't realise I had to ask permission of ordinary buildings on the street.) I politely and courteously questioned him on what authority he was telling me this, and informed him that I really liked the interplay of light and shadow and colour on the burnt orange wall.......and continued with my shots....




















These two shots were taken at the Saturday flea market on Alvaro Obregon in Colonia Roma, and I couldn't resist these sputnik-style antique chandelier light fittings, and the shadows they cast on the plump cushioned chair and sofa...















Do you have a photography etiquette tale to tell?? For more shadows cast this week, check out Shadow Shot Sunday by clicking here. Enjoy!!

24 comments:

garydenness said...

There's always one, huh. I had a run in with the photo police (ie, not real police) a few months ago and looked into the issue.

The law seems from what I can tell to be pretty much the same as it is in the UK and US. If you're in a public place you can take a photo of anything you want.

But. We're immigrants in a country where the rights and wrongs according to the law are open to interpretation, invention and complete fabrication, and there's only so far I think we would want to push the issue. With the real police anyway. We're always going to be on a loser.

But like you, I always ask before I take a close up of a person. It's not legally necessary. But it is polite.

Catherine said...

thanks for the clarification - I thought this was the case here in mexico!!

Magical Mystical Teacher said...

When I was a teenager, I took my first trip to the Deep South. In Charleston, South Carolina, I saw some African American women walling up and down the street, selling huge bouquets of flowers. The colors were stunning! I had my camera along, and asked one of the women if I could take her picture with the flowers. She said something like this: "I don't want no pictures, just buy my flowers!"

I walked a way empty-handed.

SSS: Healing Work

Tom Hilton said...

Great shadows.

Few weeks ago I was downtown on a Saturday and happened on a shoot of some kind (tv, commercial, movie, I don't know)--so of course I started taking pictures. Some very officious guy came by and told me I couldn't take any pictures. Of course, they were on a public street, so the guy was full of it--but I just moved to a more discreet location and took more photos anyway.

Chasing Purple Dreams said...

I’m glad you continued with your photo taking, they are very nice shadows on the orange wall! And I really like the middle shot, nice juxtaposition.
I drive past a house regularly that I would love to photograph, it on quite a busy street and it is very run down. I think it looks charming, but it in such disrepair I doubt it would be very charming to live in. I love to get some snaps of it, but I would hate the owners to spot me and be embarrassed. Do you think I should take the plunge????

Richie's 2ts Inspires said...

Great job... or else we all missed those great shots of yours.

Happy SS, dear Cath.

ENjoy...
/chie

Sylvia K said...

Seems there has to be a wet blanket everywhere these days! I love all your shots today -- as always! The last one made me smile, looked like a strange critter sitting on the chair, watching the world go by! Hope your weekend is off to a great start, Catherine! Enjoy!

Sylvia

NatureFootstep said...

the first shadow phot is really good, it is almosst hard to tell the shadow from the real thing. :)

Ralph said...

You responded politely to Mr. Stern! This subject with its vertical motif does attract our eyes, the artistry stunning. I have to think that he may be overreacting to a law that may or may not be in effect. I agree that one must not be a pest - and you weren’t!

nana_ang_poppaphil said...

Great shots, love the shadows you have captured.

Beverley Baird said...

Great shadows for the week! Love the lines of the first especially.
I have always wanted to photograph the reflections in the window of the hose behind us but I am always afraid I'll be charged as a peeping tom! lol
Hope you are having a wonderful weekend!

Pagan Sphinx said...

Cool finds. I have been the recipient of disapproval for photographing ordinary things. One convenience store owner accused me of breaking U.S. homeland security rules because I was taking photos of the neighborhood around his store. I just ignored him.

When I was in the Castro section of San Francisco this summer, I saw a man walking up the street wearing nothing but tattooed skin, a pair of cowboy boots and a sailor hat. His side way glance toward my camera said "don't you dare" and of course, I would never. I could have asked him, but he was walking briskly. :-)

My SSS entry here

Catherine said...

wow what a lot of interesting encounters we have had in our pursuit of polite photography - so fascinating to read them all!!

johanna said...

wonderful shots! these *critters* look so awesome!!

EG Wow said...

OH, I think I understand! Not too long ago I heard someone call from a distance telling me to go away and take photos somewhere else. Since I was standing on the road and taking photos of wild plants beside a creek, I ignored him. I was wondering what he wanted to hide. For sure I wasn't doing anything wrong and I suspect you weren't either.

LauraX said...

great shadows!

Catherine said...

still more stories of the unofficial photo police - why do people get so upset??

Jeanette said...

I too have had people question my photo choices, usually downtown where I work. People have asked why are you taking close-up pictures? Is that about to be torn down or something? No, I just like the shadow of the building or fence or gate or whatever I am capturing.
Anyway, your photos are wonderful. Good eye for catching the one at the Flea Market.
Thanks for sharing!!

Kay L. Davies said...

My father, who took photographs to illustrate the articles he wrote for newspapers and magazines, always had model-release forms for people to sign whenever he used their photos and names. It has made me nervous about taking photographs of strangers, or posting pictures of other people in our tour group on my blog or Facebook.
I doubt if I would have been as bold as you, facing an annoyed Mexican (even though I love Mexico and its people) to challenge his authority.
Fortunately, he turned out to have none, but he might equally well have been a policeman. As I'm sure you know, Mexico operates on the Napoleonic code, guilty until proven innocent, which is rather scary.
I've also been told Mexican prisons are not only less elegant than North American (and possibly British) prisons, they also don't cater to the prisoners. Unless a prisoner has family or friends nearby to bring in food, there might be no dinner bell at all.
-- Kay, Alberta, Canada

Wendy said...

Nice shots. I can't stand the "tripod police." Once you whip out a tripod they come out of the wood work. pesky creatures.

Lisa's RetroStyle said...

Wow...so is that really a law there? Seems that they (like the US) have much more important crimes to be policing! How odd.

The wall and gate are quite lovely...so are the lights on the seats.

Catherine said...

what a great set of photo stories...wonderful to read!!

Sweet Repose-Junk Revival said...

Oh you tease with such wonderful furniture, that chair is to die for...

Loved the movie Charing Cross Road and old, old books, sad they are no longer there.

The Clip Cafe said...

I always love your shots :-)